Blog Lingofacto

Leaning on technology

One more time to make a rant on powerpoint. Do not lean on your slides like a drunken sailor leans on a lamppost, meaning for support rather than illumination. Your powerpoint, your visual aids, should work for you, not against you.

The surgical strike

Most presenters are convinced that they need to tell their audience everything. Their presentations are packed with facts and their slides are overflowing with data. The problem is, that people buy on emotion, not logic. Make a surgical strike and tell the audience...

Rehearse, rehearse, rehearse…

Imagine Tony Parker going into a big game and deciding that he can’t be bothered with warming up. He’ll just wait for the game to start to make things happen. Of course, you would find that idea to be ridiculous. Yet, how many people make presentations without even...

Don’t talk to strangers

Everyone has heard this adage so how do you apply it to presentations? It is much easier to talk with people that you know. So, your job is to learn everything you can about your audience. Knowing your audience well will help you talk to them just like talking to a...

Nobody is perfect

And that is the good news! People don’t like perfection in a presenter because it makes them feel uncomfortable. That’s because they know that they are not. How can you find some simple ways to make yourself more human – more imperfect? This is a great way to connect...

Being yourself n°2

As one funny adage goes, “Be yourself, everyone else is taken”. Just as you can sing the same song in different ways, you can swing a golf club to hit the ball in many styles. There is no one right way to go about things. But at the end of the day, every audience want...

The power of emotion

We can never repeat it enough; people understand with logic but they buy on emotion. Your job is to generate emotion during your presentation, beginning with the most powerful and indispensable one when it comes to selling… TRUST.

Vivid, colorful language

When you are making a presentation, you are creating mental images for your audience. Choose your words carefully. Use powerful, colorful words that paint images in your audience’s mind.

Ruthless execution

When making a presentation, every slide must be carefully thought out. You need ruthless execution. Nothing left to chance; everything under control. Every word you utter, every thought you express needs to be another brick in the wall.

90% of all presentations are boring

I’m exaggerating of course. 95% of all presentations are boring! And that is a mortal sin. If you are boring, you are wasting your audience’s time. They hate that and will resent you for it. No one makes friends that way. Your one key responsibility when making a...

Work backwards

In order to structure your thoughts, start with the conclusion. On what journey would you like to take your audience? What do you want to achieve? Then, work your way back to the beginning; map out the story that takes the audience to where you want them to...

Being crystal clear

In every presentation, you should define what you want your audience to do or learn. To get them to do something, you need a compelling call to action. To get them to learn something, you need to present with conviction and clarity.

Time well spent

Not every presenter feels comfortable with a laugh and a joke. Not everyone is able to turn their story into a thrilling action-packed adventure. But every speaker should be intent on entertaining their audience and teaching them something so that at the end they say,...

Just be yourself

"What makes anyone a great presenter? Simple: your audience wants an authentic story from a real person. Someone with problems and challenges. Someone with goals and ambitions. The trick to performing better is to be more of yourself."

Just having a conversation

  A recent survey in the United States showed that people feared speaking in public even more than death.   That is a strong statement! And we are talking about a country that is considered to be pretty good at standing up in public. Over-reacting to what...

Show no fear

To be fair, if there is something on the line, you are going to feel a bit nervous. Everyone gets nervous when the stakes are high. The thing is, your audience rarely sees the difference between fear and excitement. So, decide to be excited and use the...

Finding your voice

The easiest way to progress as a presenter is to work on your voice. You have to find your ‘presenter’s voice’ to make maximum impact. People are in fact much more sensitive to sound than they are aware of. Therefore, your job, is to create the best sound waves...

The rule of 3

Structure is important. In storytelling and in presentations it allows your message to be engaging, memorable and easy to follow. The rule of three is designed to help you achieve these. Derived from writing, the rule of three supposes that events, characters, and...

Hope and reality

Sometimes, we don’t make presentations based on what we’ve got, but rather we present what ‘could be’. This happens all the time. Movie producers buy scripts for sometimes millions of dollars, to then produce what they hope will become a blockbuster. The finished...

Structure sets you free

This phrase may seem contradictory at first but in fact it’s quite logical. Think about road infrastructure for a moment. You have an intricate framework that allows a car to go from point A to point B. How you arrive at point B though can vary depending on the route...

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