Structure is important. In storytelling and in presentations it allows your message to be engaging, memorable and easy to follow. The rule of three is designed to help you achieve these.

Derived from writing, the rule of three supposes that events, characters, and elements of a story become more effective and engaging to your audience when done in threes. You can see the wide use of this technique from stories such as ‘The Three Musketeers’, in Steve Jobs’ 2007 iPhone presentation, and in famous slogans;
• Faster, higher, stronger (The Olympic motto)
• Liberty, equality, fraternity (French Republic)
• Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness (American Declaration of Independence)

Try the rule of three in your next presentation by splitting your talk into three sections. If you’re selling a product or service, give three relevant benefits. And if you’re telling an inspiring story, why not go through three challenges that the protagonist overcame?

The Roger Bannister Technique

It is legend now, but back then, Roger Bannister did something that everyone else said could not be done. They said running a four-minute mile was impossible. So, how did he do it? The thing is, he didn't make this huge accomplishment by simply going out and running a...

Shakespeare was right

As Shakespeare said, “The jewel that we find, we stoop and take it, because we see it; but what we do not see, we tread upon, and never think about it.” So the question is, what jewels do your company, your products and your solutions possess that you have not been...

The value of storytelling

It has long been recognized that stories are a great way to transfer knowledge and wisdom. And better stories result in more resonance, messages that reach your audience’s heart and teach them valuable lessons. A good story helps you in a number of ways. Stories help...

3 easy ways to make better presentations

Make them shorter. If you have 20 minutes for your presentation, use only 18, if you have 10 minutes, only use 9. Your audience will love you for this one! State a very clear purpose. What is the change you hope to make? Who will be changed? If you have no purpose,...

Selling Solutions to Problems

In order for you to be able to solve your customer’s problem, you first need to be able to sell them the solution. So, how are you going to make sure you get on their radar? How are you going to convince them to devote people, time and resources to address the change?...

A rant on persuasion

The ability to persuade is much overrated. It’s hard to persuade anyone to change their beliefs or behavior. The older you get the more you realize that you cannot actually convince anyone of anything. However, we all have a need to act in ways that feel consistent,...